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5
3612-3661

  • چون الف از استقامت شد به پیش  ** او ندارد هیچ از اوصاف خویش 
  • Like (the letter) alif, he has taken the foremost place because of his straightness (rectitude): he retains nothing of his own qualities.
  • گشت فرد از کسوه‌ی خوهای خویش  ** شد برهنه جان به جان‌افزای خویش 
  • He has become separated from the garment of his own dispositions: his spirit has gone, naked, to Him who gives it increase of spirituality.
  • چون برهنه رفت پیش شاه فرد  ** شاهش از اوصاف قدسی جامه کرد 
  • Inasmuch as it went naked into the presence of the incomparable King, the King made for it a raiment of holy qualities.
  • خلعتی پوشید از اوصاف شاه  ** بر پرید از چاه بر ایوان جاه  3615
  • It put on a robe of the King's qualities: it flew up from the pit to the palace of majesty.
  • این چنین باشد چو دردی صاف گشت  ** از بن طشت آمد او بالای طشت 
  • Such is the case: when dregs become pure, they rise from the bottom of the bowl to the top.
  • در بن طشت از چه بود او دردناک  ** شومی آمیزش اجزای خاک 
  • Although it (the spirit) remained like dregs at the bottom of the bowl owing to the ill-luck of mixing with particles of earth, (this was not in accordance with its nature).
  • یار ناخوش پر و بالش بسته بود  ** ورنه او در اصل بس برجسته بود 
  • Its disagreeable companion had tied its wings and plumes; else (it would have risen, for) originally it was very soaring.
  • چون عتاب اهبطوا انگیختند  ** هم‌چو هاروتش نگون آویختند 
  • When they uttered the rebuke Get ye down, they suspended it, head first, like Hárút.
  • بود هاروت از ملاک آسمان  ** از عتابی شد معلق هم‌چنان  3620
  • Hárút was one of the angels of Heaven: on account of a (Divine) rebuke he was suspended thus.
  • سرنگون زان شد که از سر دور ماند  ** خویش را سر ساخت و تنها پیش راند 
  • He was (suspended), head downwards, because he remained far aloof from the Head and made himself the head and advanced alone.
  • آن سپد خود را چو پر از آب دید  ** کر استغنا و از دریا برید 
  • When the basket saw itself to be full of water, it behaved with independence and parted from the sea.
  • بر جگر آبش یکی قطره نماند  ** بحر رحمت کرد و او را باز خواند 
  • (Afterwards, when) not a single drop of water remained inside it, the sea showed mercy and called it back.
  • رحمتی بی‌علتی بی‌خدمتی  ** آید از دریا مبارک ساعتی 
  • From the (Divine) Sea comes an uncaused undeserved mercy in a blessed hour.
  • الله الله گرد دریابار گرد  ** گرچه باشند اهل دریابار زرد  3625
  • For God's sake, for God's sake, frequent the Seashore, though those who dwell on the seashore are pale,
  • تا که آید لطف بخشایش‌گری  ** سرخ گردد روی زرد از گوهری 
  • In order that the grace of a Benefactor may come (to thee) and that thy pale face may be reddened by a jewel.
  • زردی رو بهترین رنگهاست  ** زانک اندر انتظار آن لقاست 
  • Yellowness (paleness) of face is the best of complexions, because it is in expectation of that meeting (with God);
  • لیک سرخی بر رخی که آن لامعست  ** بهر آن آمد که جانش قانعست 
  • But the redness on a face that is beaming appears (there) because his (its owner's) soul is content;
  • که طمع لاغر کند زرد و ذلیل  ** نیست او از علت ابدان علیل 
  • For (mere) hope makes him lean, pale, and wretched: he is not ill with bodily ailment.
  • چون ببیند روی زرد بی‌سقم  ** خیره گردد عقل جالینوس هم  3630
  • The reason of even (a physician like) Galen becomes distraught when it sees a pale face without (unaccompanied by any symptom of) disease.
  • چون طمع بستی تو در انوار هو  ** مصطفی گوید که ذلت نفسه 
  • When thou hast fixed thy hope on the Light of Him (God), Mustafá (Mohammed) says (concerning such an one), “His carnal self is abased.”
  • نور بی‌سایه لطیف و عالی است  ** آن مشبک سایه‌ی غربالی است 
  • The shadeless light is beautiful and lofty; the one enclosed in network is (only) the shadow of a sieve.
  • عاشقان عریان همی‌خواهند تن  ** پیش عنینان چه جامه چه بدن 
  • Amatores corpus volunt nudum; enervatis nil interest vestisne sit an corpus. [Lovers want to be naked of body; to the impotent what (difference is there between) a (naked) body and (one covered by) a garment?]
  • روزه‌داران را بود آن نان و خوان  ** خرمگس را چه ابا چه دیگدان 
  • The (delicious) bread and dishes of food are (reserved) for the fasters; for the horse-fly what difference is there between the soup and the trivet?
  • دگربار استدعاء شاه از ایاز کی تاویل کار خود بگو و مشکل منکران را و طاعنان را حل کن کی ایشان را در آن التباس رها کردن مروت نیست 
  • How the King (Mahmud) requested Ayáz for the second time, saying, “Explain thy case and solve the difficulty felt by the incredulous and censorious; for it is not (like thy) generosity to leave them in perplexity.”
  • این سخن از حد و اندازه‌ست بیش  ** ای ایاز اکنون بگو احوال خویش  3635
  • This topic is beyond limit and measure. “Now, O Ayáz, tell of thy ‘states.’
  • هست احوال تو از کان نوی  ** تو بدین احوال کی راضی شوی 
  • Thy states’ are from the mine of novelty” how shouldst thou be satisfied with these (vulgar) ‘states’?
  • هین حکایت کن از آن احوال خوش  ** خاک بر احوال و درس پنج و شش 
  • Hark, tell the story of those goodly ‘states’- dust (be thrown) upon the ‘states’ and lessons of the five (elements) and the six (directions)!”
  • حال باطن گر نمی‌آید بگفت  ** حال ظاهر گویمت در طاق وجفت 
  • If the inward “state” is not to be told, (yet) I will tell thee the outward “state” in a word or two,
  • که ز لطف یار تلخیهای مات  ** گشت بر جان خوشتر از شکرنبات 
  • (Namely), that by grace of the Beloved the bitternesses of death were made sweeter than sugar-cane to the soul.
  • زان نبات ار گرد در دریا رود  ** تلخی دریا همه شیرین شود  3640
  • If the dust from that sugar-cane should enter the sea, all the bitterness of the sea would become sweet.
  • صدهزار احوال آمد هم‌چنین  ** باز سوی غیب رفتند ای امین 
  • Even so a hundred thousand “states” came (hither) and went back to the Unseen, O trusted one.
  • حال هر روزی بدی مانند نی  ** هم‌چو جو اندر روش کش بند نی 
  • Each day’s “state” is not like (that of) the day before: (they are passing) as a  rive that hath no obstacle in its course.
  • شادی هر روز از نوعی دگر  ** فکرت هر روز را دیگر اثر 
  • Each day’s joy is of a different kind, each day’s thought makes a different impression.
  • تمثیل تن آدمی به مهمان‌خانه و اندیشه‌های مختلف به مهمانان مختلف عارف در رضا بدان اندیشه‌های غم و شادی چون شخص مهمان‌دوست غریب‌نواز خلیل‌وار کی در خلیل باکرام ضیف پیوسته باز بود بر کافر و ممن و امین و خاین و با همه مهمانان روی تازه داشتی 
  • Comparison of the human body to a guest-house and of the diverse thoughts to the diverse guests. The gnostic, acquiescing in those thoughts of sorrow or joy, resembles a hospitable person who treats strangers with kindness., like Khalíl (Abraham); for Khalíl’s door was always open to receive his guest with honour— infidel and true believer and trusty and treacherous alike; and he would show a cheerful face to all his guests.
  • هست مهمان‌خانه این تن ای جوان  ** هر صباحی ضیف نو آید دوان 
  • This body, O youth, is a guest house: every morning a new guest comes running (into it).
  • هین مگو کین مانند اندر گردنم  ** که هم اکنون باز پرد در عدم  3645
  • Beware, do not say, “This (guest) is a burden to me,” for presently he will fly back into non-existence.
  • هرچه آید از جهان غیب‌وش  ** در دلت ضیفست او را دار خوش 
  • Whatsoever comes into thy heart from the invisible world is they guest: entertain it well!
  • حکایت آن مهمان کی زن خداوند خانه گفت کی باران فرو گرفت و مهمان در گردن ما ماند 
  • Story of the guest concerning whom the wife of the master of the house said, “The rain has set in, and our guest is left on our hands.”
  • آن یکی را بیگهان آمد قنق  ** ساخت او را هم‌چو طوق اندر عنق 
  • A guest came to a certain man at a late hour: he (the master of the house) made him (at home) like a collar on the neck.
  • خوان کشید او را کرامتها نمود  ** آن شب اندر کوی ایشان سور بود 
  • He brought trays of food and showed him every courtesy; on that night there was a feast in their parish.
  • مرد زن را گفت پنهانی سخن  ** که امشب ای خاتون دو جامه خواب کن 
  • The man spoke secretly to his wife, saying, “To-night, mistress, make two beds.”
  • پستر ما را بگستر سوی در  ** بهر مهمان گستر آن سوی دگر  3650
  • Lay our bed towards the door, and lay a bed on the other side for the guest.”
  • گفت زن خدمت کنم شادی کنم  ** سمع و طاعه ای دو چشم روشنم 
  • The wife replied, “I will do (this) service, I shall be glad (to do it). To hear is to obey, O light of mine eyes!”
  • هر دو پستر گسترید و رفت زن  ** سوی ختنه‌سور کرد آنجا وطن 
  • The wife laid both the beds and (then) went off to the circumcision feast and stayed there (a long time).
  • ماند مهمان عزیز و شوهرش  ** نقل بنهادند از خشک و ترش 
  • The worthy guest and her husband remained (in the house): the host set before him a dessert of fruit and wine.
  • در سمر گفتند هر دو منتجب  ** سرگذشت نیک و بد تا نیم شب 
  • Both the excellent men related (to each other) their good and bad experiences (and sat) chatting till midnight.
  • بعد از آن مهمان ز خواب و از سمر  ** شد در آن پستر که بد آن سوی در  3655
  • Afterwards the guest, being sleepy and tired of talking, went to the bed that was on the opposite side to the door.
  • شوهر از خجلت بدو چیزی نگفت  ** که ترا این سوست ای جان جای خفت 
  • From (a feeling of) shame (delicacy) the husband did not tell him anything or say, “My dear friend, your bed is on this side;
  • که برای خواب تو ای بوالکرم  ** پستر آن سوی دگر افکنده‌ام 
  • I have had the bed for you to sleep in laid over there, most noble sir.”
  • آن قراری که به زن او داده بود  ** گشت مبدل و آن طرف مهمان غنود 
  • (So) the arrangement which he had made with his wife was altered, and the guest lay down on the other side (of the room). During the night it began to rain violently in that place, (and continued so
  • آن شب آنجا سخت باران در گرفت  ** کز غلیظی ابرشان آمد شگفت 
  • long) that they were astonished at the thickness of the clouds.
  • زن بیامد بر گمان آنک شو  ** سوی در خفتست و آن سو آن عمو  3660
  • (When) the wife came (home), she thought her husband was sleeping towards the door, and the uncle on the other side.
  • رفت عریان در لحاف آن دم عروس  ** داد مهمان را به رغبت چند بوس 
  • The wife immediately undressed and went to bed and kissed the guest fondly several times.