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6
1705-1754

  • چون چهارم بار آن ترک خطا  ** لاغ از آن استا همی‌کرد اقتضا  1705
  • When for the fourth time the Turk of Khitá was demanding a jest from the master(-tailor),
  • رحم آمد بر وی آن استاد را  ** کرد در باقی فن و بیداد را 
  • The master took pity on him and put aside (abandoned) artfulness and injustice.
  • گفت مولع گشت این مفتون درین  ** بی‌خبر کین چه خسارست و غبین 
  • He said (to himself), ‘This infatuated man has a great desire for these (facetious tales), not knowing what a loss and swindle they are (for him).’
  • بوسه‌افشان کرد بر استاد او  ** که بمن بهر خدا افسانه گو 
  • (Nevertheless) he (the Turk) showered kisses on (the face and eyes of) the master, crying, ‘For God's sake tell me a story!’
  • ای فسانه گشته و محو از وجود  ** چند افسانه بخواهی آزمود 
  • O thou who hast become a story and (art) dead to (useful) existence, how long wilt thou wish to make trial of stories?
  • خندمین‌تر از تو هیچ افسانه نیست  ** بر لب گور خراب خویش ایست  1710
  • No story is more laughable than thou (thyself): stand (and meditate) on the edge of thine own ruinous grave!
  • ای فرو رفته به گور جهل و شک  ** چند جویی لاغ و دستان فلک 
  • O thou who hast gone down into the grave of ignorance and doubt, how long wilt thou seek (to hear) the jests and tales of Time?
  • تا بکی نوشی تو عشوه‌ی این جهان  ** که نه عقلت ماند بر قانون نه جان 
  • How long wilt thou listen to the blandishments of this world that leave neither thy mind underanged nor thy spirit?
  • لاغ این چرخ ندیم کرد و مرد  ** آب روی صد هزاران چون تو برد 
  • The jests of Time, this mean and petty boon-companion, have robbed of honour a hundred thousand like thee.
  • می‌درد می‌دوزد این درزی عام  ** جامه‌ی صدسالگان طفل خام 
  • This Universal Tailor is ever tearing and stitching the garments of a hundred travellers silly as children.
  • لاغ او گر باغها را داد داد  ** چون دی آمد داده را بر باد داد  1715
  • If his jests conferred a gift on the orchards (in spring), when December came they (his jests) gave that gift to the winds.
  • پیره‌طفلان شسته پیشش بهر کد  ** تا به سعد و نحس او لاغی کند 
  • The old children sit down beside him to beg that he will jest (and amuse them) by (giving them) fortunes good or bad.
  • گفتن درزی ترک را هی خاموش کی اگر مضاحک دگر گویم قبات تنگ آید 
  • How the tailor said to the Turk, “Hey, hold your tongue: if I tell any more funny stories the coat will be (too) tight for you.”
  • گفت درزی ای طواشی بر گذر  ** وای بر تو گر کنم لاغی دگر 
  • The tailor said, ‘Begone, unmanly fellow! Woe to you if I make another jest;
  • پس قبایت تنگ آید باز پس  ** این کند با خویشتن خود هیچ کس 
  • (For) then, after that, the coat will be (too) tight for you: does any one practice this (fraud) on himself?
  • خنده‌ی چه رمزی ار دانستیی  ** تو به جای خنده خون بگرستیی 
  • What laughter (is this)? If you had an inkling (of the truth), instead of laughing you would weep (tears of) blood.’
  • بیان آنک بی‌کاران و افسانه‌جویان مثل آن ترک‌اند و عالم غرار غدار هم‌چو آن درزی و شهوات و زبان مضاحک گفتن این دنیاست و عمر هم‌چون آن اطلس پیش این درزی جهت قبای بقا و لباس تقوی ساختن 
  • Explaining that the idle folk who wish (to hear) stories are like the Turk, and that the deluding and treacherous World is like the tailor, and that lusts and women are (like) this World's telling laughable jokes, and that Life resembles the piece of satin placed before this Tailor to be made into a coat of eternity and a garment of piety.
  • اطلس عمرت به مقراض شهور  ** برد پاره‌پاره خیاط غرور  1720
  • The Tailor, (who is) Worldly Vanity, takes away the satin of your life, bit by bit, with his scissors, (which are) the months.
  • تو تمنا می‌بری که اختر مدام  ** لاغ کردی سعد بودی بر دوام 
  • You wish that your star might always jest and your happiness continue for ever.
  • سخت می‌تولی ز تربیعات او  ** وز دلال و کینه و آفات او 
  • You are very angry with its quartile aspects and its disdain and enmity and mischiefs;
  • سخت می‌رنجی ز خاموشی او  ** وز نحوس و قبض و کین‌کوشی او 
  • You are very annoyed with its silence and inauspiciousness and severity and its endeavour to show hostility,
  • که چرا زهره‌ی طرب در رقص نیست  ** بر سعود و رقص سعد او مه‌ایست 
  • Saying, ‘Why doesn't the merry Venus dance?’ Do not depend on its good luck and auspicious dance.
  • اخترت گوید که گر افزون کنم  ** لاغ را پس کلیت مغبون کنم  1725
  • Your star says, ‘If I jest any more, I shall cause you to be swindled entirely.’
  • تو مبین قلابی این اختران  ** عشق خود بر قلب‌زن بین ای مهان 
  • Do not regard the counterfeiting of these stars: regard your love for the counterfeiter, O despicable man.
  • مثل 
  • Parable.
  • آن یکی می‌شد به ره سوی دکان  ** پیش ره را بسته دید او از زنان 
  • A certain man was on the way to his shop (when) he found the road in front of him barred by women.
  • پای او می‌سوخت از تعجیل و راه  ** بسته از جوق زنان هم‌چو ماه 
  • He was hurrying along hot-foot, and the way was blocked by a crowd of women (beautiful) as the moon.
  • رو به یک زن کرد و گفت ای مستهان  ** هی چه بسیارید ای دخترچگان 
  • He turned his face to one woman and said, ‘O vile (creature), how numerous you are, little girls, eh!’
  • رو بدو کرد آن زن و گفت ای امین  ** هیچ بسیاری ما منکر مبین  1730
  • The woman turned towards him and replied, ‘O man of trust, do not think it dreadful that there are so many of us.
  • بین که با بسیاری ما بر بساط  ** تنگ می‌آید شما را انبساط 
  • Consider that notwithstanding the multitude of us on the earth you (men) find it insufficient for your enjoyment.
  • در لواطه می‌فتید از قحط زن  ** فاعل و مفعول رسوای زمن 
  • Propter paucitatem feminarum inciditis in paedicationem: infamissini in mundo sunt agens et patiens.’ [Because of the scarcity of women, you engage in sodomy: (both) active and passive (homosexuals) are the shame of the world.]
  • تو مبین این واقعات روزگار  ** کز فلک می‌گردد اینجا ناگوار 
  • (O Súfí), do not regard these happenings of Time which (proceed) from heaven (and) come to pass intolerably here.
  • تو مبین تحشیر روزی و معاش  ** تو مبین این قحط و خوف و ارتعاش 
  • Do not regard the (anxious) husbanding of (one's) daily bread and livelihood and this dearth (of food) and fear and trembling,
  • بین که با این جمله تلخیهای او  ** مرده‌ی اویید و ناپروای او  1735
  • (But) consider that in spite of all its (the World's) bitternesses ye are mortally enamoured of it and recklessly devoted to it.
  • رحمتی دان امتحان تلخ را  ** نقمتی دان ملک مرو و بلخ را 
  • Deem bitter tribulation to be a (Divine) mercy, deem the kingdom of Mervand Balkh to be a (Divine) vengeance.
  • آن براهیم از تلف نگریخت و ماند  ** این براهیم از شرف بگریخت و راند 
  • That Ibráhím fled not from destruction and remained (safe), while this Ibráhím fled from (worldly) honour and rode away.
  • آن نسوزد وین بسوزد ای عجب  ** نعل معکوس است در راه طلب 
  • That one is not burnt, and this one is burnt. Oh, wonderful! In the Way of search (for God) everything is upside down.”
  • باز مکرر کردن صوفی سال را 
  • How the Súfí repeated his questions.
  • گفت صوفی قادرست آن مستعان  ** که کند سودای ما را بی زیان 
  • The Súfí said, “He (God) whose help is invoked hath the power to make our trading free from loss.
  • آنک آتش را کند ورد و شجر  ** هم تواند کرد این را بی‌ضرر  1740
  • He who turns the fire (of Nimrod) into roses and trees is also able to make this (World-fire) harmless.
  • آنک گل آرد برون از عین خار  ** هم تواند کرد این دی را بهار 
  • He who brings forth roses from the very midst of thorns is also able to turn this winter into spring.
  • آنک زو هر سرو آزادی کند  ** قادرست ار غصه را شادی کند 
  • He by whom every cypress is made ‘free’ (evergreen) hath the power if He would turn sorrow into joy.
  • آنک شد موجود از وی هر عدم  ** گر بدارد باقیش او را چه کم 
  • He by whom every non-existence is made existent—what damage would He suffer if He were to preserve it for ever?
  • آنک تن را جان دهد تا حی شود  ** گر نمیراند زیانش کی شود 
  • He who gives the body a soul that it may live—how would He be a loser if He did not cause it to die?
  • خود چه باشد گر ببخشد آن جواد  ** بنده را مقصود جان بی‌اجتهاد  1745
  • What, indeed, would it matter if that Bounteous One should bestow on His servant the desire of his soul without (painful) toil,
  • دور دارد از ضعیفان در کمین  ** مکر نفس و فتنه‌ی دیو لعین 
  • And keep far off from poor (mortals) the cunning of the flesh and the temptation of the Devil (which lurk) in ambush?”
  • جواب دادن قاضی صوفی را 
  • The Cadi's reply to the Súfí.
  • گفت قاضی گر نبودی امر مر  ** ور نبودی خوب و زشت و سنگ و در 
  • The Cadi said, “Were there no bitter (stern) Commandment (from God) and were there no good and evil and no pebbles and pearls,
  • ور نبودی نفس و شیطان و هوا  ** ور نبودی زخم و چالیش و وغا 
  • And were there no flesh and Devil and passions, and were there no blows and battle and war,
  • پس به چه نام و لقب خواندی ملک  ** بندگان خویش را ای منهتک 
  • Then by what name and title would the King call His servants, O abandoned man?
  • چون بگفتی ای صبور و ای حلیم  ** چون بگفتی ای شجاع و ای حکیم  1750
  • How could He say, ‘O steadfast one’ and ‘O forbearing one’? How could He say, ‘O brave one’ and ‘O wise one’?
  • صابرین و صادقین و منفقین  ** چون بدی بی ره‌زن و دیو لعین 
  • How could there be steadfast and sincere and spending men without a brigand and accursed Devil?
  • رستم و حمزه و مخنث یک بدی  ** علم و حکمت باطل و مندک بدی 
  • Rustam and Hamza and a catamite would be (all) one; knowledge and wisdom would be annulled and utterly demolished.
  • علم و حکمت بهر راه و بی‌رهیست  ** چون همه ره باشد آن حکمت تهیست 
  • Knowledge and wisdom exist for the purpose of (distinguishing between) the right path and the wrong paths: when all (paths) are the right path, knowledge and wisdom are void (of meaning).
  • بهر این دکان طبع شوره‌آب  ** هر دو عالم را روا داری خراب 
  • Do you think it allowable that both the worlds should be ruined for the sake of this briny (foul) shop of the (sensual) nature?