English    Türkçe    فارسی   

6
1733-1782

  • تو مبین این واقعات روزگار  ** کز فلک می‌گردد اینجا ناگوار 
  • (O Súfí), do not regard these happenings of Time which (proceed) from heaven (and) come to pass intolerably here.
  • تو مبین تحشیر روزی و معاش  ** تو مبین این قحط و خوف و ارتعاش 
  • Do not regard the (anxious) husbanding of (one's) daily bread and livelihood and this dearth (of food) and fear and trembling,
  • بین که با این جمله تلخیهای او  ** مرده‌ی اویید و ناپروای او  1735
  • (But) consider that in spite of all its (the World's) bitternesses ye are mortally enamoured of it and recklessly devoted to it.
  • رحمتی دان امتحان تلخ را  ** نقمتی دان ملک مرو و بلخ را 
  • Deem bitter tribulation to be a (Divine) mercy, deem the kingdom of Mervand Balkh to be a (Divine) vengeance.
  • آن براهیم از تلف نگریخت و ماند  ** این براهیم از شرف بگریخت و راند 
  • That Ibráhím fled not from destruction and remained (safe), while this Ibráhím fled from (worldly) honour and rode away.
  • آن نسوزد وین بسوزد ای عجب  ** نعل معکوس است در راه طلب 
  • That one is not burnt, and this one is burnt. Oh, wonderful! In the Way of search (for God) everything is upside down.”
  • باز مکرر کردن صوفی سال را 
  • How the Súfí repeated his questions.
  • گفت صوفی قادرست آن مستعان  ** که کند سودای ما را بی زیان 
  • The Súfí said, “He (God) whose help is invoked hath the power to make our trading free from loss.
  • آنک آتش را کند ورد و شجر  ** هم تواند کرد این را بی‌ضرر  1740
  • He who turns the fire (of Nimrod) into roses and trees is also able to make this (World-fire) harmless.
  • آنک گل آرد برون از عین خار  ** هم تواند کرد این دی را بهار 
  • He who brings forth roses from the very midst of thorns is also able to turn this winter into spring.
  • آنک زو هر سرو آزادی کند  ** قادرست ار غصه را شادی کند 
  • He by whom every cypress is made ‘free’ (evergreen) hath the power if He would turn sorrow into joy.
  • آنک شد موجود از وی هر عدم  ** گر بدارد باقیش او را چه کم 
  • He by whom every non-existence is made existent—what damage would He suffer if He were to preserve it for ever?
  • آنک تن را جان دهد تا حی شود  ** گر نمیراند زیانش کی شود 
  • He who gives the body a soul that it may live—how would He be a loser if He did not cause it to die?
  • خود چه باشد گر ببخشد آن جواد  ** بنده را مقصود جان بی‌اجتهاد  1745
  • What, indeed, would it matter if that Bounteous One should bestow on His servant the desire of his soul without (painful) toil,
  • دور دارد از ضعیفان در کمین  ** مکر نفس و فتنه‌ی دیو لعین 
  • And keep far off from poor (mortals) the cunning of the flesh and the temptation of the Devil (which lurk) in ambush?”
  • جواب دادن قاضی صوفی را 
  • The Cadi's reply to the Súfí.
  • گفت قاضی گر نبودی امر مر  ** ور نبودی خوب و زشت و سنگ و در 
  • The Cadi said, “Were there no bitter (stern) Commandment (from God) and were there no good and evil and no pebbles and pearls,
  • ور نبودی نفس و شیطان و هوا  ** ور نبودی زخم و چالیش و وغا 
  • And were there no flesh and Devil and passions, and were there no blows and battle and war,
  • پس به چه نام و لقب خواندی ملک  ** بندگان خویش را ای منهتک 
  • Then by what name and title would the King call His servants, O abandoned man?
  • چون بگفتی ای صبور و ای حلیم  ** چون بگفتی ای شجاع و ای حکیم  1750
  • How could He say, ‘O steadfast one’ and ‘O forbearing one’? How could He say, ‘O brave one’ and ‘O wise one’?
  • صابرین و صادقین و منفقین  ** چون بدی بی ره‌زن و دیو لعین 
  • How could there be steadfast and sincere and spending men without a brigand and accursed Devil?
  • رستم و حمزه و مخنث یک بدی  ** علم و حکمت باطل و مندک بدی 
  • Rustam and Hamza and a catamite would be (all) one; knowledge and wisdom would be annulled and utterly demolished.
  • علم و حکمت بهر راه و بی‌رهیست  ** چون همه ره باشد آن حکمت تهیست 
  • Knowledge and wisdom exist for the purpose of (distinguishing between) the right path and the wrong paths: when all (paths) are the right path, knowledge and wisdom are void (of meaning).
  • بهر این دکان طبع شوره‌آب  ** هر دو عالم را روا داری خراب 
  • Do you think it allowable that both the worlds should be ruined for the sake of this briny (foul) shop of the (sensual) nature?
  • من همی‌دانم که تو پاکی نه خام  ** وین سالت هست از بهر عوام  1755
  • I know that you are pure (enlightened), not raw (foolish), and that these questions of yours are (asked) for the sake of (instructing) the vulgar.
  • جور دوران و هر آن رنجی که هست  ** سهل‌تر از بعد حق و غفلتست 
  • The cruelty of Time (Fortune) and every affliction that exists are lighter than farness from God and forgetfulness (of Him),
  • زآنک اینها بگذرند آن نگذرد  ** دولت آن دارد که جان آگه برد 
  • Because these (afflictions) will pass, (but) that (forgetfulness) will not. (Only) he that brings his spirit (to God) awake (and mindful of Him) is possessed of felicity.”
  • حکایت در تقریر آنک صبر در رنج کار سهل‌تر از صبر در فراق یار بود 
  • A Story setting forth that patience in bearing worldly affliction is easier than patience in bearing separation from the Beloved.
  • آن یکی زن شوی خود را گفت هی  ** ای مروت را به یک ره کرده طی 
  • A certain woman said to her husband, “Hey, O you who have finished with generosity once and for all,
  • هیچ تیمارم نمی‌داری چرا  ** تا بکی باشم درین خواری چرا 
  • Why have you no care for me? How long shall I dwell in this abode of misery?”
  • گفت شو من نفقه چاره می‌کنم  ** گرچه عورم دست و پایی می‌زنم  1760
  • The husband replied, “I am doing my best to earn money; though I am destitute, I am moving hand and foot.
  • نفقه و کسوه‌ست واجب ای صنم  ** از منت این هر دو هست و نیست کم 
  • O beloved, it is my duty (to provide you with) money and clothes: you get both these from me and they are not insufficient.”
  • آستین پیرهن بنمود زن  ** بس درشت و پر وسخ بد پیرهن 
  • The wife showed (him) the sleeve of her chemise: the chemise was very coarse and dirty.
  • گفت از سختی تنم را می‌خورد  ** کس کسی را کسوه زین سان آورد 
  • “It is so rough,” said she, “it eats (wounds) my body: does any one get a garment of this kind for any one?”
  • گفت ای زن یک سالت می‌کنم  ** مرد درویشم همین آمد فنم 
  • He said, “O wife, I will ask you one question. I am a poor man: this is all I know (how to do).
  • این درشتست و غلیظ و ناپسند  ** لیک بندیش ای زن اندیشه‌مند  1765
  • This (chemise) is rough and coarse and disagreeable, but think (well), O thoughtful (anxious) wife!
  • این درشت و زشت‌تر یا خود طلاق  ** این ترا مکروه‌تر یا خود فراق 
  • Is this (chemise) rougher and nastier, or divorce? Is this (chemise) more odious to you, or separation?”
  • هم‌چنان ای خواجه‌ی تشنیع زن  ** از بلا و فقر و از رنج و محن 
  • Even so, O Khwája who art reviling on account of affliction and poverty and distress and tribulations,
  • لا شک این ترک هوا تلخی‌دهست  ** لیک از تلخی بعد حق بهست 
  • No doubt this renunciation of sensuality gives bitter pain, but ’tis better than the bitterness of being far from God.
  • گر جهاد و صوم سختست و خشن  ** لیک این بهتر ز بعد ممتحن 
  • If fighting (against the flesh) and fasting are hard and rough, yet these are better than being far from Him who inflicts tribulation.
  • رنج کی ماند دمی که ذوالمنن  ** گویدت چونی تو ای رنجور من  1770
  • How should pain endure for a single moment when the Giver of favours says to thee, “How art thou, O My sick one?”
  • ور نگوید کت نه آن فهم و فن است  ** لیک آن ذوق تو پرسش کردنست 
  • And (even) if He say (it) not, because thou hast not the understanding and knowledge (needed) for it, yet thy inward feeling (of supplication) is (equivalent to His) inquiring (after thee).
  • آن ملیحان که طبیبان دل‌اند  ** سوی رنجوران به پرسش مایل‌اند 
  • Those beauteous ones who are spiritual physicians turn towards the sick to inquire (after them);
  • وز حذر از ننگ و از نامی کنند  ** چاره‌ای سازند و پیغامی کنند 
  • And if they be afraid of (incurring) disgrace and (loss of) reputation, they devise some means and send a message;
  • ورنه در دلشان بود آن مفتکر  ** نیست معشوقی ز عاشق بی‌خبر 
  • Or if not, that (care for the sick) is pondered in their hearts: no beloved is unaware (forgetful) of his lover.
  • ای تو جویای نوادر داستان  ** هم فسانه‌ی عشق‌بازان را بخوان  1775
  • O thou who desirest (to hear) a wondrous tale, read the story of them that play the game of love.
  • بس بجوشیدی درین عهد مدید  ** ترک‌جوشی هم نگشتی ای قدید 
  • Thou hast been boiling mightily during (all) this long time, (and yet), O dried meat, thou hast not even become half-cooked.
  • دیده‌ای عمری تو داد و داوری  ** وانگه از نادیدگان ناشی‌تری 
  • During a (whole) life-time thou hast seen the justice and jurisdiction (of God), and then (after all) thou art more ignorant than the blind.
  • هر که شاگردیش کرد استاد شد  ** تو سپس‌تر رفته‌ای ای کور لد 
  • Whoever serves Him as a pupil becomes a master, (but) thou hast gone backwards, O blind fool!
  • خود نبود از والدینت اختبار  ** هم نبودت عبرت از لیل و نهار 
  • Verily thou hast learned nothing from thy parents, nor hast thou taken a lesson from night and day.
  • مثل 
  • Parable.
  • عارفی پرسید از آن پیر کشیش  ** که توی خواجه مسن‌تر یا که ریش  1780
  • A (Súfí) gnostic asked an old Christian priest, “Sire, art thou the more advanced in age, or thy beard?”
  • گفت نه من پیش ازو زاییده‌ام  ** بی ز ریشی بس جهان را دیده‌ام 
  • He replied, “Nay; I was born before it: I have seen much of the world without a beard.”
  • گفت ریشت شد سپید از حال گشت  ** خوی زشت تو نگردیدست وشت 
  • He (the Súfí) said, “Thy beard has turned white, it has changed, (but) thy evil disposition has not become good.”