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6
3910-3959

  • آنچ پنجه سال بافیدی به هوش  ** زان نسیج خود بغلتانی بپوش  3910
  • For fifty years thou hast woven on (the loom of) thy intelligence: (now) put on an undervest of the fabric which thou thyself hast woven.
  • از نوایت گوش یاران بود خوش  ** دست بیرون آر و گوش خود بکش 
  • The ears of thy friends were delighted by thy song: (now) put forth thy hand and pull thine own ear.
  • سر بدی پیوسته خود را دم مکن  ** پا و دست و ریش و سبلت گم مکن 
  • (Formerly) thou wert always a head (leader): do not make thyself a tail, do not lose thy feet and hands and beard and moustache.
  • بازی آن تست بر روی بساط  ** خویش را در طبع آر و در نشاط 
  • (Now) ’tis for thee to make a move on the (chess-) board: restore thyself to thy normal state (of spiritual health) and thy (natural) vigour.
  • ذکر آن پادشاه که آن دانشمند را به اکراه در مجلس آورد و بنشاند ساقی شراب بر دانشمند عرضه کرد ساغر پیش او داشت رو بگردانید و ترشی و تندی آغاز کرد شاه ساقی را گفت کی هین در طبعش آر ساقی چندی بر سرش کوفت و شرابش در خورد داد الی آخره 
  • Anecdote of a king who brought a learned doctor into his banquet-hall by force and made him sit down. (When) the cup-bearer offered him wine and held out the goblet to him, the doctor averted his face and began to look sour and behave rudely. The king said to the cup-bearer, “Come, put him in a good humour.” The cup-bearer beat him on the head several times and made him drink the wine, etc.
  • پادشاهی مست اندر بزم خوش  ** می‌گذشت آن یک فقیهی بر درش 
  • (Whilst) a drunken king was feasting merrily, a certain jurist passed by his gate.
  • کرد اشارت کش درین مجلس کشید  ** وان شراب لعل را با او چشید  3915
  • He gave directions, saying, “Bring him into this hall and give him a drink of the ruby wine.”
  • پس کشیدندش به شه بی‌اختیار  ** شست در مجلس ترش چون زهر و مار 
  • So they brought him to the king, (for) he had no choice (power to resist): he sat down in the hall, (looking) sour as poison and snakes.
  • عرضه کردش می نپذرفت او به خشم  ** از شه و ساقی بگردانید چشم 
  • (When) he (the cup-bearer) offered him wine, he angrily refused it and averted his eyes from the king and the cup-bearer,
  • که به عمر خود نخوردستم شراب  ** خوشتر آید از شرابم زهر ناب 
  • Saying, “I have never drunk wine in my life: rank poison would please me better than wine.
  • هین به جای می به من زهری دهید  ** تا من از خویش و شما زین وا رهید 
  • Hey, give me some poison instead of the wine, that I may be delivered from myself and ye from this (impoliteness).”
  • می نخورده عربده آغاز کرد  ** گشته در مجلس گران چون مرگ و درد  3920
  • Without having drunk wine, he began to make a row and became as disagreeable to the company as death and (its) pangs.
  • هم‌چو اهل نفس و اهل آب و گل  ** در جهان بنشسته با اصحاب دل 
  • (This is) like (the behaviour of) carnal earthly-minded people in the world when they sit (associate) with spiritual folk.
  • حق ندارد خاصگان را در کمون  ** از می احرار جز در یشربون 
  • God keeps His elect (ever) drinking secretly the wine of the free.
  • عرضه می‌دارند بر محجوب جام  ** حس نمی‌یابد از آن غیر کلام 
  • They offer the cup to one who is veiled (uninitiated), (but his) perception apprehends naught thereof except the (literal) words.
  • رو همی گرداند از ارشادشان  ** که نمی‌بیند به دیده دادشان 
  • He averts his face from their guidance because he does not see their gift with his eye.
  • گر ز گوشش تا به حلقش ره بدی  ** سر نصح اندر درونشان در شدی  3925
  • If there were a passage from his ear to his throat, the hidden meaning of their admonition would have entered his inward parts.
  • چون همه نارست جانش نیست نور  ** که افکند در نار سوزان جز قشور 
  • Inasmuch as his spirit is wholly fire, not light, who would throw anything but husks into a blazing fire?
  • مغز بیرون ماند و قشر گفت رفت  ** کی شود از قشر معده گرم و زفت 
  • The kernel remains outside and the husk, (consisting of mere) words, goes (in): how should the stomach be made warm and stout by husks?
  • نار دوزخ جز که قشر افشار نیست  ** نار را با هیچ مغزی کار نیست 
  • The Fire of Hell torments only the husks: the Fire has nothing to do with any kernel;
  • ور بود بر مغز ناری شعله‌زن  ** بهر پختن دان نه بهر سوختن 
  • And if a fire should dart its flames at the kernel, know that ’tis in order to cook it, not to burn it.
  • تا که باشد حق حکیم این قاعده  ** مستمر دان در گذشته و نامده  3930
  • So long as God is the Wise, know that this law is perpetual (both) in the past and in the time that has not (yet) come.
  • مغز نغز و قشرها مغفور ازو  ** مغز را پس چون بسوزد دور ازو 
  • The pure kernels and (also) the husks are pardoned by Him: how, then, should He burn the kernel? Far (be it) from Him!
  • از عنایت گر بکوبد بر سرش  ** اشتها آید شراب احمرش 
  • If in His grace He beat the head of him (who resembles the husk), he (such an one) will feel an eager desire for the red wine;
  • ور نکوبد ماند او بسته‌دهان  ** چون فقیه از شرب و بزم این شهان 
  • And if He do not beat him, he will remain, like the jurist, with his mouth closed against the potations and festivity of these (spiritual) kings.
  • گفت شه با ساقیش ای نیک‌پی  ** چه خموشی ده به طبعش آر هی 
  • The king said to his cup-bearer, “O well-conducted (youth), why art thou silent? Give (it him) and put him in good humour.”
  • هست پنهان حاکمی بر هر خرد  ** هرکه را خواهد به فن از سر برد  3935
  • Over every mind there is a hidden Ruler, (who) cunningly diverts from his purpose whomsoever He will.
  • آفتاب مشرق و تنویر او  ** چون اسیران بسته در زنجیر او 
  • The sun in the East and his radiance are bound like captives in His chain.
  • چرخ را چرخ اندر آرد در زمن  ** چون بخواند در دماغش نیم فن 
  • He causes the (celestial) sphere to revolve immediately when He chants half of a cunning spell in its brain.
  • عقل کو عقل دگر را سخره کرد  ** مهره زو دارد ویست استاد نرد 
  • The mind which dominates another mind has (obtains) the dice (of victory) from Him: He is the Master-player.
  • چند سیلی بر سرش زد گفت گیر  ** در کشید از بیم سیلی آن زحیر 
  • He (the cup-bearer) gave him (the jurist) several cuffs on the head, saying, “Take (the cup)!” The tormented man drained it in dread of (receiving further) blows.
  • مست گشت و شاد و خندان شد چو باغ  ** در ندیمی و مضاحک رفت و لاغ  3940
  • He became tipsy and merry and smiling (gay) as a garden: he began to act like a boon-companion and tell ridiculous stories and make jokes.
  • شیرگیر و خوش شد انگشتک بزد  ** سوی مبرز رفت تا میزک کند 
  • He became pot-valiant and jolly and snapped his fingers: in latrinam ivit ut mingeret. [He became pot-valiant and jolly and snapped his fingers: he went to the latrine in order to urinate.]
  • یک کنیزک بود در مبرز چو ماه  ** سخت زیبا و ز قرناقان شاه 
  • Erat in latrina puella lunae similis, venustissima, una de regis ancillis. [A maiden as (lovely as) the (full) moon was in the latrine, very beautiful and one of the maidservants of the king.]
  • چون بدید او را دهانش باز ماند  ** عقل رفت و تن ستم‌پرداز ماند 
  • When he espied her, his mouth gaped in amazement, his reason fled and his body was ready for violence.
  • عمرها بوده عزب مشتاق و مست  ** بر کنیزک در زمان در زد دو دست 
  • Per aeva coelebs vixerat: extemplo cupidine et furore accensus puellae manus injecit. [He had been a bachelor (for) ages: passionate and drunk (with lust), he immediately grabbed the maidservant (with his) two hands.]
  • بس طپید آن دختر و نعره فراشت  ** بر نیامد با وی و سودی نداشت  3945
  • Valde trepidavit puella et clamorem sustulit: ei non poterat resistere, operam perdidit. [The maiden trembled greatly and raised a clamor: she could not oppose him and (her resistance) had no benefit.]
  • زن به دست مرد در وقت لقا  ** چون خمیر آمد به دست نانبا 
  • Femina viro in manus tempore congressus tradita is like dough in the hands of a baker. [A woman in the hands of a man at the moment of (such an) encounter is like dough in the hands of a baker.]
  • بسرشد گاهیش نرم و گه درشت  ** زو بر آرد چاق چاقی زیر مشت 
  • He kneads it now gently, now roughly, and makes it groan under (the thumps of) his fist;
  • گاه پهنش واکشد بر تخته‌ای  ** درهمش آرد گهی یک لخته‌ای 
  • Now he draws it out flat on a board (rolling-pin), now for a bit he rolls it up;
  • گاه در وی ریزد آب و گه نمک  ** از تنور و آتشش سازد محک 
  • Now he pours water on it and now salt: he puts it to the ordeal of oven and fire.
  • این چنین پیچند مطلوب و طلوب  ** اندرین لعبند مغلوب و غلوب  3950
  • Thus are the sought and the seeker intertwined: (both) the conquered and the conqueror are (engaged) in this sport.
  • این لعب تنها نه شو را با زنست  ** هر عشیق و عاشقی را این فنست 
  • This sport is not between husband and wife only: this is the practice of everything that is loved and loves.
  • از قدیم و حادث و عین و عرض  ** پیچشی چون ویس و رامین مفترض 
  • A mutual embracing, like (that of) Wís and Rámín, is obligatory (Divinely ordained) between eternal and non-eternal and between substance and accident;
  • لیک لعب هر یکی رنگی دگر  ** پیچش هر یک ز فرهنگی دگر 
  • But the sport is of a different character in each case: the embracing is for a different reason in each instance.
  • شوی و زن را گفته شد بهر مثال  ** که مکن ای شوی زن را بد گسیل 
  • This is said as a parable for husband and wife, meaning, “O husband, do not dismiss thy wife unkindly.
  • آن شب گردک نه ینگا دست او  ** خوش امانت داد اندر دست تو  3955
  • On thy wedding-night did not the bridesmaid place her (the wife's) hand in thy hand as a goodly trust?
  • کانچ با او تو کنی ای معتمد  ** از بد و نیکی خدا با تو کند 
  • For the evil or good which thou doest unto her, O man worthy of confidence, God will do (the same) unto thee.”
  • حاصل این‌جا این فقیه از بی‌خودی  ** نه عفیفی ماندش و نه زاهدی 
  • A handful of (greedy) pottage-eaters direct their looks at me: oculi semine impleti dum pressant manibus testiculos; [A handful of (greedy) pottage-eaters direct their looks at me: (their) eyes full of sperm (while their) hands (are) squeezing their testicles;]
  • آن فقیه افتاد بر آن حورزاد  ** آتش او اندر آن پنبه فتاد 
  • And even he that has regard for decorum steals covert glances et penem fricat. [And even he that has regard for decorum steals covert glances (while) rubbing (his) penis.]
  • جان به جان پیوست و قالب‌ها چخید  ** چون دو مرغ سربریده می‌طپید 
  • Anima cum anima conjuncta est, corpora mutuo amplexu implicata tanquam duae aves abscissis capitibus tremebant. [Soul was joined to soul and (their) bodies strove (in mutual embrace), trembling like two decapitated birds.]