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1
2272-2321

  • از خدا بویی نه او را نی اثر ** دعویش افزون ز شیث و بو البشر
  • He has no scent or trace of God, (but) his pretension is greater than (that of) Seth and the Father of mankind (Adam).
  • دیو ننموده و را هم نقش خویش ** او همی‌‌گوید ز ابدالیم و بیش‌‌
  • The Devil (is so ashamed of him that he) has not shown to him even his portrait, (yet) he (the impostor) is saying, ‘We are of the Abdál and are more (we are superior even to them).’
  • حرف درویشان بدزدیده بسی ** تا گمان آید که هست او خود کسی‌‌
  • He has stolen many an expression used by dervishes, in order that he himself may be thought to be a (holy) personage.
  • خرده گیرد در سخن بر بایزید ** ننگ دارد از درون او یزید 2275
  • In his talk he cavils at Báyazíd, (although) Yazíd would be ashamed of his inward (thoughts and feelings).
  • بی‌‌نوا از نان و خوان آسمان ** پیش او ننداخت حق یک استخوان‌‌
  • (He is) without (any) portion of the bread and viands of Heaven: God did not throw a single bone to him.
  • او ندا کرده که خوان بنهاده‌‌ام ** نایب حقم خلیفه زاده‌‌ام‌‌
  • He has proclaimed, ‘I have laid out the dishes, I am the Vicar of God, I am the son of the (spiritual) Khalífa:
  • الصلا ساده دلان پیچ پیچ ** تا خورید از خوان جودم سیر هیچ‌‌
  • Welcome (to the feast), O simple-hearted ones, tormented (with hunger), that from my bounteous table ye may eat your fill’—of nothing.
  • سالها بر وعده‌‌ی فردا کسان ** گرد آن در گشته فردا نارسان‌‌
  • Some persons, (relying) on the promise of ‘To-morrow,’ have wandered for years around that door, (but) ‘To-morrow’ never comes.
  • دیر باید تا که سر آدمی ** آشکارا گردد از بیش و کمی‌‌ 2280
  • It needs a long time for the inmost conscience of a man to become evident, more and less (both in great and small matters),
  • زیر دیوار بدن گنج است یا ** خانه‌‌ی مار است و مور و اژدها
  • (So that we may know whether) beneath the wall of his body there is treasure, or whether there is the house of snake and ant and dragon.
  • چون که پیدا گشت کاو چیزی نبود ** عمر طالب رفت آگاهی چه سود
  • When it became clear that he was naught (worthless), (by that time) the life of the seeker (disciple) had passed: what use (was) the knowledge (to him)?
  • در بیان آن که نادر افتد که مریدی در مدعی مزور اعتقاد به صدق ببندد که او کسی است و بدین اعتقاد به مقامی برسد که شیخش در خواب ندیده باشد و آب و آتش او را گزند نکند و شیخش را گزند کند و لیکن به نادر نادر
  • Explaining how it may happen, (though) rarely, that a disciple sincerely puts his faith in a false impostor (and believes) that he is a (holy) personage, and by means of this faith attains unto a (spiritual) degree which his Shaykh has never (even) dreamed of, and (then) fire and water do him no hurt, though they hurt his Shaykh; but this occurs very seldom.
  • لیک نادر طالب آید کز فروغ ** در حق او نافع آید آن دروغ‌‌
  • But exceptionally comes (the case of) a disciple to whom, because of his (spiritual) illumination, that falsehood (of the impostor) is beneficial.
  • او به قصد نیک خود جایی رسد ** گر چه جان پنداشت و آن آمد جسد
  • He, by his goodly purpose, attains unto a (high) degree, although he fancied (the impostor to be) soul, and that (soul) proved to be (only) body.
  • چون تحری در دل شب قبله را ** قبله نی و آن نماز او روا 2285
  • (It is) like trying to find the qibla in the heart (depth) of night: the qibla is not (found), but his (the seeker's) prayer is valid.
  • مدعی را قحط جان اندر سر است ** لیک ما را قحط نان بر ظاهر است‌‌
  • The impostor has a dearth of soul within, but we have a dearth of bread without.
  • ما چرا چون مدعی پنهان کنیم ** بهر ناموس مزور جان کنیم‌‌
  • Why should we conceal (our poverty) like the impostor and suffer agony for the sake of false reputation?”
  • صبر فرمودن اعرابی زن خود را و فضیلت صبر و فقر بیان کردن با زن‌‌
  • How the Bedouin bade his wife be patient and declared to her the excellence of poverty.
  • شوی گفتش چند جویی دخل و کشت ** خود چه ماند از عمر افزون‌‌تر گذشت‌‌
  • Her husband said to her, “How long wilt thou seek income and seed-produce? What indeed is left of (our) life? Most (of it) is past.
  • عاقل اندر بیش و نقصان ننگرد ** ز آن که هر دو همچو سیلی بگذرد
  • The sensible man does not look at increase or deficiency, because both (these) will pass by like a torrent.
  • خواه صاف و خواه سیل تیره رو ** چون نمی‌‌پاید دمی از وی مگو 2290
  • Whether it (life) be pure (clear and untroubled) or whether it be a turbid flood, do not speak of it, since it is not enduring for a moment.
  • اندر این عالم هزاران جانور ** می‌‌زید خوش عیش بی‌‌زیر و زبر
  • In this world thousands of animals are living happily, without up and down (anxiety).
  • شکر می‌‌گوید خدا را فاخته ** بر درخت و برگ شب ناساخته‌‌
  • The dove on the tree is uttering thanks to God, though her food for the night is not (yet) ready.
  • حمد می‌‌گوید خدا را عندلیب ** کاعتماد رزق بر تست ای مجیب‌‌
  • The nightingale is singing glory to God (and saying), ‘I rely on Thee for my daily bread, O Thou who answerest (prayer).’
  • باز دست شاه را کرده نوید ** از همه مردار ببریده امید
  • The falcon has made the king's hand his joy (the place in which he takes delight), and has given up hope of (has become indifferent to) all carrion.
  • همچنین از پشه‌‌گیری تا به پیل ** شد عیال الله و حق نعم المعیل‌‌ 2295
  • Similarly you may take (every animal) from the gnat to the elephant: they all have become God's family (dependent on Him for their nourishment), and what an excellent nourisher is God!
  • این همه غمها که اندر سینه‌‌هاست ** از بخار و گرد بود و باد ماست‌‌
  • All these griefs that are within our breasts arise from the vapour and dust of our existence and wind (vain desire).
  • این غمان بیخ کن چون داس ماست ** این چنین شد و آن چنان وسواس ماست‌‌
  • These uprooting griefs are as a scythe to us: (to think that) this is such and such or that that is such and such is a temptation (of the Devil) to us.
  • دان که هر رنجی ز مردن پاره‌‌ای است ** جزو مرگ از خود بران گر چاره‌‌ای است‌‌
  • Know that every pain is a piece of Death: expel (that) part of Death from thee, if there be a means (of doing so).
  • چون ز جزو مرگ نتوانی گریخت ** دان که کلش بر سرت خواهند ریخت‌‌
  • When thou canst not flee from the part of Death, know that the whole of it will be poured upon thy head.
  • جزو مرگ ار گشت شیرین مر ترا ** دان که شیرین می‌‌کند کل را خدا 2300
  • If the part of Death has become sweet to thee, know that God will make the whole sweet.
  • دردها از مرگ می‌‌آید رسول ** از رسولش رو مگردان ای فضول‌‌
  • Pains are coming from Death as (his) messengers: do not avert thy face from his messenger, O foolish one!
  • هر که شیرین می‌‌زید او تلخ مرد ** هر که او تن را پرستد جان نبرد
  • Whoever lives sweetly (pleasantly) dies bitterly (painfully): whoever serves his body does not save his soul.
  • گوسفندان را ز صحرا می‌‌کشند ** آن که فربه تر مر آن را می‌‌کشند
  • Sheep are driven from the plains (to the town): they kill those that are fattest.
  • شب گذشت و صبح آمد ای تمر ** چند گیری این فسانه‌‌ی زر ز سر
  • The night is past and dawn is come. O Tamar, how long wilt thou take up (again) this tale of gold from the beginning?
  • تو جوان بودی و قانع‌‌تر بدی ** زر طلب گشتی خود اول زر بدی‌‌ 2305
  • Thou wert young (once), and (then) thou wert more contented: (now) thou hast become a seeker of gold, (but) at first thou wert gold indeed (precious and perfect).
  • رز بدی پر میوه چون کاسد شدی ** وقت میوه پختنت فاسد شدی‌‌
  • Thou wert a fruitful vine: how hast thou become unsaleable (worthless)? How hast thou become rotten when thy fruit is ripening?
  • میوه‌‌ات باید که شیرین‌‌تر شود ** چون رسن تابان نه واپس‌‌تر رود
  • Thy fruit ought to become sweeter and not move farther backwards like rope-makers.
  • جفت مایی جفت باید هم صفت ** تا بر آید کارها با مصلحت‌‌
  • Thou art my wife: the wife must be of the same quality (as the husband) in order that things may go rightly.
  • جفت باید بر مثال همدگر ** در دو جفت کفش و موزه در نگر
  • The married pair must match one another: look at a pair of shoes or boots.
  • گر یکی کفش از دو تنگ آید بپا ** هر دو جفتش کار ناید مر ترا 2310
  • If one of the shoes is too tight for the foot, the pair of them is of no use to thee.
  • جفت در یک خرد و آن دیگر بزرگ ** جفت شیر بیشه دیدی هیچ گرگ‌‌
  • Hast thou ever seen one leaf of a (folding) door small and the other large, or a wolf mated with the lion of the jungle?
  • راست ناید بر شتر جفت جوال ** آن یکی خالی و این پر مال مال‌‌
  • A pair of sacks on a camel do not balance properly when one is empty and one full to the brim.
  • من روم سوی قناعت دل قوی ** تو چرا سوی شناعت می‌‌روی‌‌
  • I march with stout heart towards contentment: why art thou betaking thyself to revilement?”
  • مرد قانع از سر اخلاص و سوز ** زین نسق می‌‌گفت با زن تا به روز
  • In this fashion the contented man, moved by sincerity and ardour, was talking to his wife till daybreak.
  • نصیحت کردن زن مر شوی را که سخن افزون از قدم و از مقام خود مگو لم تقولون ما لا تفعلونکه این سخنها اگر چه راست است این مقام توکل ترا نیست و این سخن گفتن فوق مقام و معامله‌‌ی خود زیان دارد و کبر مقتا عند الله باشد
  • How the wife counselled her husband, saying, “Do not use expressions (which are) beyond thy merit and (spiritual) rank—‘why say ye that which ye do not?’—for although these words are true, yet thou hast not attained to the degree of trust in God, and to speak thus above thy station and devotional practice is harmful and ‘exceedingly hateful in the sight of God.’”
  • زن بر او زد بانگ کای ناموس کیش ** من فسون تو نخواهم خورد بیش‌‌ 2315
  • The wife cried out at him, saying, “O thou who makest reputation thy religion, I will not swallow thy spells (deceiving speeches) any more.
  • ترهات از دعوی و دعوت مگو ** رو سخن از کبر وز نخوت مگو
  • Don't talk nonsense in thy presumption and pretension: begone, don't speak from pride and arrogance.
  • چند حرف طمطراق و کار و بار ** کار و حال خود ببین و شرم دار
  • How long (wilt thou utter) pompous and artificial phrases? Look at thine own acts and feelings and be ashamed!
  • کبر زشت و از گدایان زشت‌‌تر ** روز سرد و برف و آن گه جامه تر
  • Pride is ugly, and in beggars (all the) more ugly: (it is like) wet clothes after a cold snowy day.
  • چند دعوی و دم و باد و بروت ** ای ترا خانه چو بیت العنکبوت‌‌
  • How long (this) pretension and palaver and bluster, O thou whose house is (frail) as the house of the spider?
  • از قناعت کی تو جان افروختی ** از قناعتها تو نام آموختی‌‌ 2320
  • When hast thou illumined thy soul by contentment? Of contentment thou hast learned (only) the name.
  • گفت پیغمبر قناعت چیست گنج ** گنج را تو وا نمی‌‌دانی ز رنج‌‌
  • The Prophet said, ‘What is contentment? A treasure.’ Thou canst not distinguish the gain from the pain.