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2
3154-3203

  • What is there to fear from the flags of beggars?—for those flags are (but) a means for (getting) a mouthful of bread.
  • از علمهای گدایان ترس چیست ** کان علمها لقمه‏ی نان را رهی است‏
  • Timet puer quidam hominem corpulentum. “Ne timueris,” inquit, “O puer; ego enim vir non sum.” [About a boy’s fear of the corpulent man and how that person said, “Don’t be afraid, O boy, since I am not manly.”]
  • ترسیدن کودک از آن شخص صاحب جثه و گفتن آن شخص که ای کودک مترس که من نامردم‏
  • Juvenis robustus puerum deprehendit solum. Palluit timore puer ne forte homo impetum faceret. [A stout youth found a boy alone. The boy turned pale from fear of the man’s intention (to attack).] 3155
  • کنگ زفتی کودکی را یافت فرد ** زرد شد کودک ز بیم قصد مرد
  • “Securus esto,” inquit, “mi pulcher; tu enim super me eris.” [He (the man) said, “Be secure, O my lovely one, since you will be on top of me. ]
  • گفت ایمن باش ای زیبای من ** که تو خواهی بود بر بالای من‏
  • Etiamsi terribilis (aspectu) sum, scito me impotentem esse ad coitum: me sicut camelum conscende, propelle.” [“Although I am dreadful (in appearance), know me (to be an impotent) catamite. Mount me like a camel (and) thrust.”]
  • من اگر هولم مخنث دان مرا ** همچو اشتر بر نشین می‏ران مرا
  • (With) the appearance of men and the reality like this— Adam without, the accursed Devil within—
  • صورت مردان و معنی این چنین ** از برون آدم درون دیو لعین‏
  • O you that are big as the people of ‘Ád, you resemble the drum against which a branch was beaten by the wind.
  • آن دهل را مانی ای زفت چو عاد ** که بر او آن شاخ را می‏کوفت باد
  • A fox abandoned his prey for the sake of a drum like a wind-filled leathern bag, 3160
  • روبهی اشکار خود را باد داد ** بهر طبلی همچو خیک پر ز باد
  • (But) when he found no (real) fatness in the drum, he said, “A hog is better than this empty bag.”
  • چون ندید اندر دهل او فربهی ** گفت خوکی به ازین خیک تهی‏
  • Foxes are afraid of the noise of the drum; (but) the wise man beats it ever so much, saying, “Speak not!”
  • روبهان ترسند ز آواز دهل ** عاقلش چندان زند که لا تقل‏
  • The story of an archer and his fear of a horseman who was riding in a forest.
  • قصه‏ی تیر اندازی و ترسیدن او از سواری که در بیشه می‏رفت‏
  • A horseman, armed and very terrible (in appearance), was riding in the forest on a high-bred horse.
  • یک سواری با سلاح و بس مهیب ** می‏شد اندر بیشه بر اسبی نجیب‏
  • An expert archer espied him, and then from fear of him drew his bow,
  • تیر اندازی به حکم او را بدید ** پس ز خوف او کمان را در کشید
  • To shoot an arrow. The horseman shouted to him, “I am a weakling, though my body is big. 3165
  • تا زند تیری سوارش بانگ زد ** من ضعیفم گر چه زفت استم جسد
  • Take heed! Take heed! Do not regard my bigness, for in the hour of battle I am less than an old woman.”
  • هان و هان منگر تو در زفتی من ** که کمم در وقت جنگ از پیر زن‏
  • “Pass on,” said he; “thou hast spoken well, else by reason of my fear I should have shot a barb at thee.”
  • گفت رو که نیک گفتی ور نه نیش ** بر تو می‏انداختم از ترس خویش‏
  • Many are they whom implements of war have slain, (since they held) such a sword in their hands, without the manhood (to use it).
  • بس کسان را کالت پیکار کشت ** بی‏رجولیت چنان تیغی به مشت‏
  • If you don the armour of Rustams, your soul goes (your life is lost) when you are not the man for it.
  • گر بپوشی تو سلاح رستمان ** رفت جانت چون نباشی مرد آن‏
  • Make your soul a shield and drop the sword, O son: whoever is headless (selfless) saves his head from this King. 3170
  • جان سپر کن تیغ بگذار ای پسر ** هر که بی‏سر بود از این شه برد سر
  • Those weapons of yours are your (selfish) contriving and plotting; they have sprung from you and at the same time have wounded your soul.
  • آن سلاحت حیله و مکر تو است ** هم ز تو زایید و هم جان تو خست‏
  • Since you have gained nothing by these contrivings, abandon contrivance, that happy fortunes may meet (you).
  • چون نکردی هیچ سودی زین حیل ** ترک حیلت کن که پیش آید دول‏
  • Since you have not for one moment enjoyed (any) fruit from the arts (of the schools), bid farewell to the arts, and seek always the Lord of bounties.
  • چون که یک لحظه نخوردی بر ز فن ** ترک فن گو می‏طلب رب المنن‏
  • Since these sciences bring you no blessing, make yourself a dunce and leave ill luck behind.
  • چون مبارک نیست بر تو این علوم ** خویشتن گولی کن و بگذر ز شوم‏
  • Like the angels, say, “We have no knowledge, O God, except what Thou hast taught us.” 3175
  • چون ملایک گو که لا علم لنا ** یا الهی غیر ما علمتنا
  • Story of the desert Arab and his putting sand in the sack and the philosopher's rebuking him.
  • قصه‏ی اعرابی و ریگ در جوال کردن و ملامت کردن آن فیلسوف او را
  • A certain Arab of the desert loaded a camel with two big sacks—(there was) one full of grain.
  • یک عرابی بار کرده اشتری ** دو جوال زفت از دانه پری‏
  • He was seated on the top of both sacks. A glib philosopher questioned him.
  • او نشسته بر سر هر دو جوال ** یک حدیث انداز کرد او را سؤال‏
  • He asked him about his native land and led him to talk and said many fine things in the course of (his) enquiry.
  • از وطن پرسید و آوردش به گفت ** و اندر آن پرسش بسی درها بسفت‏
  • Afterwards he said to him, “What are these two sacks filled with? Tell (me) the truth of the matter.”
  • بعد از آن گفتش که این هر دو جوال ** چیست آگنده بگو مصدوق حال‏
  • He replied, “In one sack I have wheat; in the other is some sand—not food for men.” 3180
  • گفت اندر یک جوالم گندم است ** در دگر ریگی نه قوت مردم است‏
  • “Why,” he asked, “did you load this sand?” “In order that the other sack might not remain alone,” he replied.
  • گفت تو چون بار کردی این رمال ** گفت تا تنها نماند آن جوال‏
  • “For wisdom's sake,” said he, “pour half the wheat of that pannier into the other,
  • گفت نیم گندم آن تنگ را ** در دگر ریز از پی فرهنگ را
  • So that the sacks may be lightened, and the camel too.” He (the Arab) cried, “Bravo! O clever and noble sage!
  • تا سبک گردد جوال و هم شتر ** گفت شاباش ای حکیم اهل و حر
  • Such subtle thought and excellent judgement! And you so naked, (journeying) on foot and in fatigue!”
  • این چنین فکر دقیق و رای خوب ** تو چنین عریان پیاده در لغوب‏
  • The good man took pity on the philosopher and resolved to mount him on the camel. 3185
  • رحمتش آمد بر حکیم و عزم کرد ** کش بر اشتر بر نشاند نیک مرد
  • He said to him again, “O fair-spoken sage, explain a little about your own circumstances as well.
  • باز گفتش ای حکیم خوش سخن ** شمه‏ای از حال خود هم شرح کن‏
  • (With) such intelligence and talent as you have, are you a vizier or a king? Tell the truth.”
  • این چنین عقل و کفایت که تراست ** تو وزیری یا شهی بر گوی راست‏
  • He answered, “I am not (either of) these two: I am of the common folk. Look at my appearance and dress.”
  • گفت این هر دو نیم از عامه‏ام ** بنگر اندر حال و اندر جامه‏ام‏
  • He asked, “How many camels have you? How many oxen?” “I have neither these nor those,” he replied: “do not dig at me.”
  • گفت اشتر چند داری چند گاو ** گفت نه این و نه آن ما را مکاو
  • He said, “At any rate, what goods have you in your shop?” He answered, “Where have I a shop, and where a dwelling-place?” 3190
  • گفت رختت چیست باری در دکان ** گفت ما را کو دکان و کو مکان‏
  • “Then,” said he, “I will ask about money. How much money (have you)?—for you are a solitary wanderer and one whose counsel is prized.
  • گفت پس از نقد پرسم نقد چند ** که تویی تنها رو و محبوب پند
  • With you is the elixir which changes the copper of the world (into) gold: understanding and knowledge are inlaid with pearls.”
  • کیمیای مس عالم با تو است ** عقل و دانش را گهر تو بر تو است‏
  • “By God,” he replied, “O chief of the Arabs, in my whole property there is not the means of (buying) food for the night.
  • گفت و الله نیست یا وجه العرب ** در همه ملکم وجوه قوت شب‏
  • I run about with bare feet and naked body. If any one will give me a loaf of bread—thither I go.
  • پا برهنه تن برهنه می‏دوم ** هر که نانی می‏دهد آن جا روم‏
  • From this wisdom and learning and excellence (of mind) I have got nothing but phantasy and headache.” 3195
  • مر مرا زین حکمت و فضل و هنر ** نیست حاصل جز خیال و درد سر
  • Then the Arab said to him, “Begone far from my side, so that your ill-luck may not rain upon me.
  • پس عرب گفتش که شو دور از برم ** تا نبارد شومی تو بر سرم‏
  • Take far away from me that unlucky wisdom of yours: your speech is unlucky for (all) the people of the time.
  • دور بر آن حکمت شومت ز من ** نطق تو شرم است بر اهل زمن‏
  • Either go you in that direction, and I will run in this direction; or if your way be forwards, I will go back.
  • یا تو آن سو رو من این سو می‏دوم ** ور ترا ره پیش من واپس روم‏
  • One sack of wheat and the other of sand is better for me than these vain contrivings.
  • یک جوالم گندم و دیگر ز ریگ ** به بود زین حیله‏های مرده‏ریگ‏
  • My foolishness is a very blessed foolishness, for my heart is well furnished (with spiritual graces) and my soul is devout.” 3200
  • احمقی‏ام بس مبارک احمقی است ** که دلم با برگ و جانم متقی است‏
  • If thou desire that misery should vanish (from thee), endeavour that wisdom should vanish from thee—
  • گر تو خواهی کت شقاوت کم شود ** جهد کن تا از تو حکمت کم شود
  • The wisdom which is born of (human) nature and phantasy, the wisdom which lacks the overflowing grace of the Light of the Glorious (God).
  • حکمتی کز طبع زاید وز خیال ** حکمتی بی‏فیض نور ذو الجلال‏
  • The wisdom of this world brings increase of supposition and doubt; the wisdom of the Religion bears (one) above the sky.
  • حکمت دنیا فزاید ظن و شک ** حکمت دینی برد فوق فلک‏