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6
1603-1652

  • Make yourself one that speaks eloquently from ecstatic feeling, lest you become a slave to argumentation like me.”
  • خویشتن را ساز منطیقی ز حال  ** تا نگردی هم‌چو من سخره‌ی مقال 
  • How the Súfi questioned the Cadi.
  • سال کردن آن صوفی قاضی را 
  • The Súfi said, “Since (all) the gold is from a single Mine, why is this beneficial and that other harmful?
  • گفت صوفی چون ز یک کانست زر  ** این چرا نفعست و آن دیگر ضرر 
  • Since the whole (Creation) has come from a single Hand, why tees has this one come sober and that one intoxicated? 1605
  • چونک جمله از یکی دست آمدست  ** این چرا هوشیار و آن مست آمدست 
  • Since (all) these rivers flow from a single Sea, why is this one honey and that one poison in the mouth?
  • چون ز یک دریاست این جوها روان  ** این چرا نوش است و آن زهر دهان 
  • Since all lights are (derived) from the everlasting Sun, where fore did the true dawn and the false dawn rise?
  • چون همه انوار از شمس بقاست  ** صبح صادق صبح کاذب از چه خاست 
  • Since the blackness of every seeing person’s eye is (derived) from a single Collyrium wherefore did true, sight and strabism come (into being)?
  • چون ز یک سرمه‌ست ناظر را کحل  ** از چه آمد راست‌بینی و حول 
  • Since God is the Governor of the Mint, how is it that (both) good and spurious coins are struck?
  • چونک دار الضرب را سلطان خداست  ** نقد را چون ضرب خوب و نارواست 
  • Since God has called the Way ‘My Way,’ wherefore is this, one a trusty escort and that one a brigand? 1610
  • چون خدا فرمود ره را راه من  ** این خفیر از چیست و آن یک راه‌زن 
  • How can (both) the (noble) freeman and the (base) fool come from a single womb, since it is certain that the son is (the expression of) his father’s inmost nature?
  • از یک اشکم چون رسد حر و سفیه  ** چون یقین شد الولد سر ابیه 
  • Who (ever) saw a Unity with so many thousand (numbers), (or) a hundred thousand motions (proceeding) from the essence of Rest?”
  • وحدتی که دید با چندین هزار  ** صد هزاران جنبش از عین قرار 
  • The Cadi’s reply to the Súfi.
  • جواب گفتن آن قاضی صوفی را 
  • The Cadi said, “O Súfi’ do not be perplexed: hearken to a parable in explanation of this (mystery)
  • گفت قاضی صوفیا خیره مشو  ** یک مثالی در بیان این شنو 
  • (‘Tis) just as the disquiet of lovers is the result of the tranquillity of the one who captivates their hearts.
  • هم‌چنانک بی‌قراری عاشقان  ** حاصل آمد از قرار دلستان 
  • He stands immovable, like a mountain, in his disdain, white his lovers are quivering like leaves. 1615
  • او چو که در ناز ثابت آمده  ** عاشقان چون برگها لرزان شده 
  • His laughter stirs (them to) tears, his glory causes their glories to fade.
  • خنده‌ی او گریه‌ها انگیخته  ** آب رویش آب روها ریخته 
  • All this conditionality is tossing like foam on the surface of the unconditioned Sea.
  • این همه چون و چگونه چون زبد  ** بر سر دریای بی‌چون می‌طپد 
  • In its (the Sea’s) essence and. action there is neither opposite nor like: by it (alone) are (alt) existences clothed in robes (of existence).
  • ضد و ندش نیست در ذات و عمل  ** زان بپوشیدند هستیها حلل 
  • How should an opposite bestow being and existence on its opposite? Nay, it flees and escapes from, it.
  • ضد ضد را بود و هستی کی دهد  ** بلک ازو بگریزد و بیرون جهد 
  • What, is (the meaning of) nidd? The like (mithl), the like of (something) good or bad. How should a like make its own like? 1620
  • ند چه بود مثل مثل نیک و بد  ** مثل مثل خویشتن را کی کند 
  • When there are two likes, O God-fearing man, why should this one be more fit than that one for (the purpose of) creating?
  • چونک دو مثل آمدند ای متقی  ** این چه اولیتر از آن در خالقی 
  • Opposites and likes, in number as the leaves of the orchard, are (but) as a flake of foam on the Sea that hath no like or opposite.
  • بر شمار برگ بستان ند و ضد  ** چون کفی بر بحر بی‌ضدست و ند 
  • Perceive that the victory and defeat of the Sea are unconditioned: how, (then), should there be room for conditionality in the essence of the Sea?
  • بی‌چگونه بین تو برد و مات بحر  ** چون چگونه گنجد اندر ذات بحر 
  • Your soul is the least of its playthings; (yet) how can the quality and description of the soul be ascertained?
  • کمترین لعبت او جان تست  ** این چگونه و چون جان کی شد درست 
  • Such a Sea, then, with every drop whereof the intellect and the spirit are more unfamiliar than the body— 1625
  • پس چنان بحری که در هر قطر آن  ** از بدن ناشی‌تر آمد عقل و جان 
  • How should it be contained in the narrow room of quantity and quality? There (even) Universal Reason is one of the ignorant.
  • کی بگنجد در مضیق چند و چون  ** عقل کل آنجاست از لا یعلمون 
  • Reason says to the body, ‘O lifeless thing, hast thou ever had a scent of the Sea whither all return?’
  • عقل گوید مر جسد را که ای جماد  ** بوی بردی هیچ از آن بحر معاد 
  • The body replies, ‘Assuredly I am thy shadow: who would seek help from a shadow, O soul of thy uncle?’
  • جسم گوید من یقین سایه‌ی توم  ** یاری از سایه که جوید جان عم 
  • Reason says, ‘This is the house of bewilderment, not a house where the worthy is bolder than the unworthy.’
  • عقل گوید کین نه آن حیرت سراست  ** که سزا گستاخ‌تر از ناسزاست 
  • Here the resplendent sun pays homage to the mote, like a menial. 1630
  • اندرینجا آفتاب انوری  ** خدمت ذره کند چون چاکری 
  • In this quarter the lion lays his head (in submission) before the deer; here the falcon lays (droops) his wings before the partridge.
  • شیر این سو پیش آهو سر نهد  ** باز اینجا نزد تیهو پر نهد 
  • (If) you cannot believe this, (then) bow is it that Mustafa (Mohammed) seeks a blessing from the lowly poor?
  • این ترا باور نیاید مصطفی  ** چون ز مسکینان همی‌جوید دعا 
  • If you reply that it was for the purpose of teaching (his followers) in what respect was his leaving them in absolute ignorance (of the reason for his action) a means of causing them to understand?
  • گر بگویی از پی تعلیم بود  ** عین تجهیل از چه رو تفهیم بود 
  • Nay, but he knows that the King deposits the royal treasure in ruined places.
  • بلک می‌داند که گنج شاهوار  ** در خرابیها نهد آن شهریار 
  • Evil thoughts (about the saint) are (due to) his presenting an appearance contrary to the reality’, though (in fact) every part of him is his spy (informing him of Divine mysteries). 1635
  • بدگمانی نعل معکوس ویست  ** گرچه هر جزویش جاسوس ویست 
  • Nay, the Truth is absorbed in the Truth; hence seventy, nay, a hundred sects hive arisen.
  • بل حقیقت در حقیقت غرقه شد  ** زین سبب هفتاد بل صد فرقه شد 
  • (Now) I will talk to you of matters indifferent., Hark, O Súfi , open your spiritual ear very wide.
  • با تو قلماشیت خواهم گفت هان  ** صوفیا خوش پهن بگشا گوش جان 
  • Whatever blow may come to you from Heaven, always be expecting (to receive) a gift of honour after it;
  • مر ترا هم زخم که آید ز آسمان  ** منتظر می‌باش خلعت بعد آن 
  • For He is not the king to slap you and then not give you a crown and a throne on which to recline.
  • کو نه آن شاهست کت سیلی زند  ** پس نبخشد تاج و تخت مستند 
  • The whole world has (but) the value of a gnat’s wing; (but) for one slap there is an infinite reward. 1640
  • جمله دنیا را پر پشه بها  ** سیلیی را رشوت بی‌منتها 
  • Nimbly slip your neck out of this golden collar, (which is) the world, and take the slaps (that come) from God.
  • گردنت زین طوق زرین جهان  ** چست در دزد و ز حق سیلی ستان 
  • Since the prophets suffered those blows on the nape, in consequence of that affliction they have lifted their heads (high).
  • آن قفاها که انبیا برداشتند  ** زان بلا سرهای خود افراشتند 
  • But (always) be present (attentive and ready) in yourself O youth, in order that He may find you at home.
  • لیک حاضر باش در خود ای فتی  ** تا به خانه او بیابد مر ترا 
  • Else He will take back His gift of honour, saying, ‘I found nobody in the house.”
  • ورنه خلعت را برد او باز پس  ** که نیابیدم به خانه‌ش هیچ کس 
  • How the Súfi again questioned the Cadi.
  • باز سال کردن صوفی از آن قاضی 
  • The Súfi said, “How would it be if this world were to unknit the eyebrow of mercy for evermore! 1645
  • گفت صوفی که چه بودی کین جهان  ** ابروی رحمت گشادی جاودان 
  • If it were not to bring on some trouble at every moment and produce anguish by its (incessant) changes!
  • هر دمی شوری نیاوردی به پیش  ** بر نیاوردی ز تلوینهاش نیش 
  • If Night were not to steal the lamp of Day, and i December were not to sweep away the orchard that has learned to delight (in its fresh beauty)!
  • شب ندزدیدی چراغ روز را  ** دی نبردی باغ عیش آموز را 
  • If there were no stone of fever to shatter the cup of health, and if fear did not bring anxieties for (one’s) safety!
  • جام صحت را نبودی سنگ تب  ** آمنی با خوف ناوردی کرب 
  • How, indeed, would His munificence and mercy be diminished if in His bounty there were no torment?”
  • خود چه کم گشتی ز جود و رحمتش  ** گر نبودی خرخشه در نعمتش 
  • The Cadi's answer to the questions of the Súfí, and how he adduced the Story of the Turk and the Tailor as a parable.
  • جواب قاضی سال صوفی را و قصه‌ی ترک و درزی را مثل آوردن 
  • The Cadi said, “You are a very idle vagabond Súfí: you are devoid of intelligence, (you are) like the Kúfic káf. 1650
  • گفت قاضی بس تهی‌رو صوفیی  ** خالی از فطنت چو کاف کوفیی 
  • Haven't you heard that a certain sugar-lipped (story-teller) used to tell at nightfall of the perfidy of tailors,
  • تو بنشنیدی که آن پر قند لب  ** غدر خیاطان همی‌گفتی به شب 
  • Setting forth to the people old stories concerning the thievery of that class (of men)?
  • خلق را در دزدی آن طایفه  ** می‌نمود افسانه‌های سالفه