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  • در جهاد اکبر افکندم بدن  ** در ریاضت کردن و لاغر شدن 
  • I threw myself into the Greater Warfare (which consists) in practising austerities and becoming lean.
  • بانگ طبل غازیان آمد به گوش  ** که خرامیدند جیش غزوکوش 
  • (One day) there reached my ear the sound of the drums of the holy warriors; for the hard-fighting army was on the march.
  • نفس از باطن مرا آواز داد  ** که به گوش حس شنیدم بامداد 
  • My fleshly soul cried out to me from within: at morningtide I heard (its voice) with my sensuous ear,
  • خیز هنگام غزا آمد برو  ** خویش را در غزو کردن کن گرو 
  • (Saying), ‘Arise! ’Tis time to fight. Go, devote thyself to fighting in the holy war!’
  • گفتم ای نفس خبیث بی‌وفا  ** از کجا میل غزا تو از کجا  3790
  • I answered, ‘O wicked perfidious soul, what hast thou to do with the desire to fight?
  • راست گوی ای نفس کین حیلت‌گریست  ** ورنه نفس شهوت از طاعت بریست 
  • Tell the truth, O my soul! This is trickery. Else (why wouldst thou fight)?—the lustful soul is quit of obedience (to the Divine command).
  • گر نگویی راست حمله آرمت  ** در ریاضت سخت‌تر افشارمت 
  • Unless thou tell the truth, I will attack thee, I will squeeze (torment) thee more painfully (than before) in maceration.’
  • نفس بانگ آورد آن دم از درون  ** با فصاحت بی‌دهان اندر فسون 
  • Thereupon my soul, mutely eloquent, cried out in guile from within me,
  • که مرا هر روز اینجا می‌کشی  ** جان من چون جان گبران می‌کشی 
  • ‘Here thou art killing me daily, thou art putting my (vital) spirit (on the rack), like the spirits of infidels.
  • هیچ کس را نیست از حالم خبر  ** که مرا تو می‌کشی بی‌خواب و خور  3795
  • No one is aware of my plight—how thou art killing me (by keeping me) without sleep and food.
  • در غزا بجهم به یک زخم از بدن  ** خلق بیند مردی و ایثار من 
  • In war I should escape from the body at one stroke, and the people would see my manly valour and self-sacrifice.’
  • گفتم ای نفسک منافق زیستی  ** هم منافق می‌مری تو چیستی 
  • I replied, ‘O wretched soul, a hypocrite thou hast lived and a hypocrite thou wilt die: what (a pitiful thing) art thou!
  • در دو عالم تو مرایی بوده‌ای  ** در دو عالم تو چنین بیهوده‌ای 
  • In both worlds thou hast been a hypocrite, in both worlds thou art such a worthless creature.’
  • نذر کردم که ز خلوت هیچ من  ** سر برون نارم چو زنده‌ست این بدن 
  • I vowed that I would never put my head outside of (come out of) seclusion, seeing that this body is alive,
  • زانک در خلوت هر آنچ تن کند  ** نه از برای روی مرد و زن کند  3800
  • Because everything that this body does in seclusion it does with no regard to man or woman.
  • جنبش و آرامش اندر خلوتش  ** جز برای حق نباشد نیتش 
  • During seclusion the intention of (all) its movement and rest is for God's sake only.”
  • این جهاد اکبرست آن اصغرست  ** هر دو کار رستمست و حیدرست 
  • This is the Greater Warfare, and that (other) is the Lesser Warfare: both are (fit) work for (men like) Rustam and Haydar (‘Alí).
  • کار آن کس نیست کو را عقل و هوش  ** پرد از تن چون بجنبد دنب موش 
  • They are not (fit) work for one whose reason and wits fly out of his body when a mouse's tail moves.
  • آن چنان کس را بباید چون زنان  ** دور بودن از مصاف و از سنان 
  • Such a one must stay, like women, far off from the battle-field and the spears.
  • صوفیی آن صوفیی این اینت حیف  ** آن ز سوزن کشته این را طعمه سیف  3805
  • That one a Súfí and this one (too) a Súfí! Here's a pity! That one is killed by a needle, while the sword is this one's food.
  • نقش صوفی باشد او را نیست جان  ** صوفیان بدنام هم زین صوفیان 
  • He (the false Súfí) is (only) the figure of a Súfí: he has no soul (life); accordingly, the (true) Súfís get a bad name from Súfís such as these.
  • بر در و دیوار جسم گل‌سرشت  ** حق ز غیرت نقش صد صوفی نبشت 
  • Upon the door and wall of the body moulded of clay God, in His jealousy, traced the figures of a hundred Súfís (of this sort),
  • تا ز سحر آن نقشها جنبان شود  ** تا عصای موسوی پنهان شود 
  • To the end that by means of magic those figures should move and that Moses' rod should be hidden.
  • نقشها را میخورد صدق عصا  ** چشم فرعونیست پر گرد و حصا 
  • The truth of the rod swallows up the figures, (but) the Pharaoh-like eye is filled with dust and gravel (and cannot see).
  • صوفی دیگر میان صف حرب  ** اندر آمد بیست بار از بهر ضرب  3810
  • Another Súfí entered the battle-line twenty times for the purpose of fighting
  • با مسلمانان به کافر وقت کر  ** وانگشت او با مسلمانان به فر 
  • Along with the Moslems when they attacked the infidels; he did not fall back with the Moslems in their retreat.
  • زخم خورد و بست زخمی را که خورد  ** بار دیگر حمله آورد و نبرد 
  • He was wounded, but he bandaged the wound which he had received, and once more advanced to the charge and combat,
  • تا نمیرد تن به یک زخم از گزاف  ** تا خورد او بیست زخم اندر مصاف 
  • In order that his body might not die cheaply at one blow and that he might receive twenty blows in the battle.
  • حیفش آمد که به زخمی جان دهد  ** جان ز دست صدق او آسان رهد 
  • To him it was anguish that he should give up his soul at one blow and that his soul should escape lightly from the hand of his fortitude.
  • حکایت آن مجاهد کی از همیان سیم هر روز یک درم در خندق انداختی به تفاریق از بهر ستیزه‌ی حرص و آرزوی نفس و وسوسه‌ی نفس کی چون می‌اندازی به خندق باری به یک‌بار بینداز تا خلاص یابم کی الیاس احدی الراحتین او گفته کی این راحت نیز ندهم 
  • Story of the (spiritual) warrior who every day used to take one dirhem separately from a purse containing (pieces of) silver and throw it into a ditch (full of water) for the purpose of thwarting the greed and cupidity of his fleshly soul; and how his soul tempted him, saying, “Since you are going to throw (this money) into the ditch, at least throw it away all at once, so that I may gain deliverance, for despair is one of the two (possible) reliefs”; and how he replied, “I will not give thee this relief either.”
  • آن یکی بودش به کف در چل درم  ** هر شب افکندی یکی در آب یم  3815
  • A certain man had forty dirhems in his hand: every night he would throw one (of them) into the sea-water,
  • تا که گردد سخت بر نفس مجاز  ** در تانی درد جان کندن دراز 
  • In order that the long agony suffered in (the process of) deliberation might become grievous to the illusory soul.
  • با مسلمانان بکر او پیش رفت  ** وقت فر او وا نگشت از خصم تفت 
  • He (the valiant Súfí) advanced with the Moslems to attack (the infidels), (but) in the hour of retreat he did not fall back in haste before the enemy.
  • زخم دیگر خورد آن را هم ببست  ** بیست کرت رمح و تیر از وی شکست 
  • He was wounded again, (but) he bound up those (wounds) too: twenty times were the spears and arrows (of the enemy) broken by him.
  • بعد از آن قوت نماند افتاد پیش  ** مقعد صدق او ز صدق عشق خویش 
  • After that, no strength remained (in him): he fell forward (and expired in)the seat of truth because his love was true.
  • صدق جان دادن بود هین سابقوا  ** از نبی برخوان رجال صدقوا  3820
  • Truth consists in giving up the soul (to God). Hark, try to outstrip (the others) in the race! Recite from the Qur’án (the words) men who have been true.
  • این همه مردن نه مرگ صورتست  ** این بدن مر روح را چون آلتست 
  • All this dying is not the death of the (physical) form: this body is (only) like an instrument for the spirit.
  • ای بسا خامی که ظاهر خونش ریخت  ** لیک نفس زنده آن جانب گریخت 
  • Oh, there is many a raw (imperfect) one whose blood was shed externally, but whose living fleshly soul escaped to yonder side.
  • آلتش بشکست و ره‌زن زنده ماند  ** نفس زنده‌ست ارچه مرکب خون فشاند 
  • Its instrument was shattered, but the brigand was left alive: the fleshly soul is living though that on which it rode has bled to death.
  • اسپ کشت و راه او رفته نشد  ** جز که خام و زشت و آشفته نشد 
  • His (the rider's) horse was killed before his road was traversed: he became naught but ignorant and wicked and miserable.
  • گر بهر خون ریزیی گشتی شهید  ** کافری کشته بدی هم بوسعید  3825
  • If a martyr were made by every (mortal) bloodshed, an infidel killed (in battle) also would be a Bú Sa‘íd.
  • ای بسا نفس شهید معتمد  ** مرده در دنیا چو زنده می‌رود 
  • Oh, there is many a trusty martyred soul that has died (to self) in this world, (though) it is going about like the living.
  • روح ره‌زن مرد و تن که تیغ اوست  ** هست باقی در کف آن غزوجوست 
  • The brigand (animal) spirit has died, though the body, which is its sword, survives: it (the sword) is (still) in the hand of that eager warrior.
  • تیغ آن تیغست مرد آن مرد نیست  ** لیک این صورت ترا حیران کنیست 
  • The sword is that (same) sword, the man is not that (same) man; but this appearance (of identity) is a cause of bewilderment to you.
  • نفس چون مبدل شود این تیغ تن  ** باشد اندر دست صنع ذوالمنن 
  • When the soul is transformed, this sword, namely, the body, remains in the hand of (is wielded by) the action of the Beneficent (God).
  • آن یکی مردیست قوتش جمله درد  ** این دگر مردی میان‌تی هم‌چو گرد  3830
  • The one (whose fleshly soul is dead) is a man whose food is entirely (Divine) love; the other is a man hollow as dust.
  • صفت کردن مرد غماز و نمودن صورت کنیزک مصور در کاغذ و عاشق شدن خلیفه‌ی مصر بر آن صورت و فرستادن خلیفه امیری را با سپاه گران بدر موصل و قتل و ویرانی بسیار کردن بهر این غرض 
  • How an informer described a girl and exhibited the picture of her on paper, and how the Caliph of Egypt fell in love with it and sent an Amír with a mighty army to the gates of Mawsil (Mosul) and made great slaughter and devastation for the purpose (of obtaining the girl).
  • مر خلیفه‌ی مصر را غماز گفت  ** که شه موصل به حوری گشت جفت 
  • An informer said to the Caliph of Egypt, “The King of Mawsil is wedded to a houri.
  • یک کنیزک دارد او اندر کنار  ** که به عالم نیست مانندش نگار 
  • He holds in his arms a girl like whom there is no (other) beauty in the world.
  • در بیان ناید که حسنش بی‌حدست  ** نقش او اینست که اندر کاغذست 
  • She does not admit of description, for her loveliness is beyond (all) limits: here is her portrait on paper.”
  • نقش در کاغذ چو دید آن کیقباد  ** خیره گشت و جام از دستش فتاد 
  • When the Emperor saw the portrait on the paper, he became distraught and the cup dropped from his hand.
  • پهلوانی را فرستاد آن زمان  ** سوی موصل با سپاه بس گران  3835
  • Immediately he despatched to Mawsil a captain with a very mighty army,