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3
1585-1634

  • کین همه کردیم و ما زندانییم ** بد بنایی بود ما بد بانییم 1585
  • Thinking, “We have done all this and (still) we are prisoners: it was a bad building (a badly devised plan), and we are bad builders.”
  • دوم بار وهم افکندن کودکان استاد را کی او را از قرآن خواندن ما درد سر افزاید
  • How for the second time the boys made the master imagine (that he was ill), saying that their recitation of the Qur’án would increase his headache.
  • گفت آن زیرک که ای قوم پسند ** درس خوانید و کنید آوا بلند
  • The clever boy said, “O good fellows, recite the lesson and make your voices loud.”
  • چون همی‌خواندند گفت ای کودکان ** بانگ ما استاد را دارد زیان
  • When they were reciting (loudly), he said, “Boys, the noise we are making will do the master harm.
  • درد سر افزاید استا را ز بانگ ** ارزد این کو درد یابد بهر دانگ
  • The master's headache will be increased by the noise: is it worth while that he should suffer pain for the sake of (a few) pence?”
  • گفت استا راست می‌گوید روید ** درد سر افزون شدم بیرون شوید
  • The master said, “He is speaking the truth: depart. My headache is worse: go out (of the house)!”
  • خلاص یافتن کودکان از مکتب بدین مکر
  • How the boys escaped from school by this trick.
  • سجده کردند و بگفتند ای کریم ** دور بادا از تو رنجوری و بیم 1590
  • They bowed and said, “O honoured sir, may illness and danger be far from you!”
  • پس برون جستند سوی خانه‌ها ** همچو مرغان در هوای دانه‌ها
  • Then they bounded off to their homes, like birds in desire of grain.
  • مادرانشان خشمگین گشتند و گفت ** روز کتاب و شما با لهو جفت
  • Their mothers became angry with them and said, “A school-day and you at play!”
  • عذر آوردند کای مادر تو بیست ** این گناه از ما و از تقصیر نیست
  • They offered excuses (every one of them), saying, “Stop, mother! This sin does not proceed from us and is not caused by our fault.
  • از قضای آسمان استاد ما ** گشت رنجور و سقیم و مبتلا
  • By the destiny of Heaven our master has become ill and sick and afflicted.”
  • مادران گفتند مکرست و دروغ ** صد دروغ آرید بهر طمع دوغ 1595
  • The mothers said, “It is a trick and a lie: ye bring forward a hundred lies because of your greed for buttermilk.
  • ما صباح آییم پیش اوستا ** تا ببینیم اصل این مکر شما
  • In the morning we will come to (visit) the master, that we may see (what is at) the bottom of this trick of yours.”
  • کودکان گفتند بسم الله روید ** بر دروغ و صدق ما واقف شوید
  • “Go in God's name,” said the boys; “inform yourselves as to our lying or telling the truth.”
  • رفتن مادران کودکان به عیادت اوستاد
  • How the mothers of the boys went to visit the sick master.
  • بامدادان آمدند آن مادران ** خفته استا همچو بیمار گران
  • At morning those mothers came; (they found) the master in bed like one who is gravely ill,
  • هم عرق کرده ز بسیاری لحاف ** سر ببسته رو کشیده در سجاف
  • Perspiring on account of the great number of coverlets, his head bandaged and his face enveloped in the quilt.
  • آه آهی می‌کند آهسته او ** جملگان گشتند هم لا حول‌گو 1600
  • He was moaning softly: they too all began to cry “Lá hawl.”
  • خیر باشد اوستاد این درد سر ** جان تو ما را نبودست زین خبر
  • They said, “Master, we hope all will be well. This headache— by thy soul, we were not aware of it.”
  • گفت من هم بی‌خبر بودم ازین ** آگهم مادر غران کردند هین
  • He replied, “I also was not aware of it; the whoresons (the scoundrelly boys) made me aware (of it), mark you.
  • من بدم غافل بشغل قال و قیل ** بود در باطن چنین رنجی ثقیل
  • I did not notice (it), through being busy with discourse (teaching), (but) within (me) there was such a severe malady.”
  • چون بجد مشغول باشد آدمی ** او ز دید رنج خود باشد عمی
  • When a man is busy in earnest, he is blind to the sight of (unconscious of) his pain.
  • از زنان مصر یوسف شد سمر ** که ز مشغولی بشد زیشان خبر 1605
  • Joseph became (the hero of) an oft-told tale because the women of Egypt who lost consciousness in their pre-occupation (with the beauty of Joseph).
  • پاره پاره کرده ساعدهای خویش ** روح واله که نه پس بیند نه پیش
  • (Hence) they cut their fore-arms to pieces: (in such a case) the spirit is distraught, so that it looks neither behind nor before.
  • ای بسا مرد شجاع اندر حراب ** که ببرد دست یا پایش ضراب
  • Oh, many a brave man in battle whose hand or foot is cut by blows (of the sword),
  • او همان دست آورد در گیر و دار ** بر گمان آنک هست او بر قرار
  • And he bears that same hand into the combat, thinking that it remains firm (intact).
  • خود ببیند دست رفته در ضرر ** خون ازو بسیار رفته بی‌خبر
  • (Afterwards) indeed he will see that his hand has been injured (and that) much blood has gone from him unawares.
  • در بیان آنک تن روح را چون لباسی است و این دست آستین دست روحست واین پای موزه‌ی پای روحست
  • Explaining that the body is as a garment to the spirit, and that this (bodily) hand is the sleeve of the spirit's hand, and that this (bodily) foot is the shoe of the spirit's foot.
  • تا بدانی که تن آمد چون لباس ** رو بجو لابس لباسی را ملیس 1610
  • (I mention this insensibility to pain) that you may know that the body is like a garment. Go, seek the wearer of the garment, do not lick (kiss) a garment.
  • روح را توحید الله خوشترست ** غیر ظاهر دست و پای دیگرست
  • To the spirit the knowledge of the Unity (of God) is sweeter (than care for the body): it hath a hand and foot different from those which are visible.
  • دست و پا در خواب بینی و ایتلاف ** آن حقیقت دان مدانش از گزاف
  • You may behold in dream the (spiritual) hand and foot and their connexion (with the spiritual body): deem that (vision) a reality, deem it not to be in vain.
  • آن توی که بی بدن داری بدن ** پس مترس از جسم و جان بیرون شدن
  • You are such that without the (material) body you have a (spiritual) body: do not, then, dread the going forth of the soul from the body.
  • حکایت آن درویش کی در کوه خلوت کرده بود و بیان حلاوت انقطاع و خلوت و داخل شدن درین منقبت کی انا جلیس من ذکرنی و انیس من استانس بی گر با همه‌ای چو بی منی بی همه‌ای ور بی همه‌ای چو با منی با همه‌ای
  • Story of the dervish who had secluded himself in the mountains, with an account of the sweetness of severance (from the world) and seclusion and of entering upon this path, for (God hath said), “I am the companion of them that commemorate Me and the friend of them that take Me as their friend. If thou art with all, thou art without all when thou art without Me; And if thou art without all, thou art with all when thou art with Me.”
  • بود درویشی بکهساری مقیم ** خلوت او را بود هم خواب و ندیم
  • There was a dervish dwelling in a mountainous place: solitude was his bedfellow and boon-companion.
  • چون ز خالق می‌رسید او را شمول ** بود از انفاس مرد و زن ملول 1615
  • Since collectedness (spiritual quiet) was coming for him from the Creator, he was weary of the breaths of man and woman.
  • همچنانک سهل شد ما را حضر ** سهل شد هم قوم دیگر را سفر
  • Just as staying at home is easy to us, so travelling is easy to another class of people.
  • آنچنانک عاشقی بر سروری ** عاشقست آن خواجه بر آهنگری
  • In the same way as thou art in love with dominion, that worthy man is in love with the ironsmith's handicraft.
  • هر کسی را بهر کاری ساختند ** میل آن را در دلش انداختند
  • Every one has been made for some particular work, and the desire for that (work) has been put into his heart.
  • دست و پا بی میل جنبان کی شود ** خار وخس بی آب و بادی کی رود
  • How should hand and foot be set in motion without desire? How should sticks and straws go (from their place) without any water or wind?
  • گر ببینی میل خود سوی سما ** پر دولت بر گشا همچون هما 1620
  • If thou see (that) thy desire (is) towards Heaven, unfold the wings of empire, like the Humá;
  • ور ببینی میل خود سوی زمین ** نوحه می‌کن هیچ منشین از حنین
  • But if thou see (that) thy desire (is) towards the earth, keep lamenting, cease not at all from moaning.
  • عاقلان خود نوحه‌ها پیشین کنند ** جاهلان آخر بسر بر می‌زنند
  • The wise, indeed, make lamentations at first; the foolish beat their heads at the last.
  • ز ابتدای کار آخر را ببین ** تا نباشی تو پشیمان یوم دین
  • From the beginning of the affair discern the end (thereof), so that thou mayst not be repenting on the Day of Judgement.
  • دیدن زرگر عاقبت کار را و سخن بر وفق عاقبت گفتن با مستعیر ترازو
  • How a goldsmith discerned the end of the affair and spoke in accordance with the end to one who wished to borrow his scales.
  • آن یکی آمد به پیش زرگری ** که ترازو ده که بر سنجم زری
  • A certain man came to a goldsmith, saying, “Give me the scales, that I may weigh some gold.”
  • گفت خواجه رو مرا غربال نیست ** گفت میزان ده برین تسخر مه‌ایست 1625
  • The master (goldsmith) said, “Go, I have no sieve.” “Give me the scales,” he replied, “and don't stop to jest like this.”
  • گفت جاروبی ندارم در دکان ** گفت بس بس این مضاحک رابمان
  • He said, “I have no broom in the shop.” “Enough, enough!” cried the other; “leave these jokes.
  • من ترازویی که می‌خواهم بده ** خویشتن را کر مکن هر سو مجه
  • Give (me) the scales which I am asking for; don't make yourself out to be deaf, don't jump in every direction.”
  • گفت بشنیدم سخن کر نیستم ** تا نپنداری که بی معنیستم
  • He (the goldsmith) said, “I heard what you said, I am not deaf; you must not think that I am nonsensical.
  • این شنیدم لیک پیری مرتعش ** دست لرزان جسم تو نا منتعش
  • I heard this (request), but you are a shaky old man: your hand is trembling and your body is not erect;
  • وان زر تو هم قراضه‌ی خرد مرد ** دست لرزد پس بریزد زر خرد 1630
  • And moreover that gold of yours consists of little tiny filings: your hand trembles, so the fragments of gold will drop (from it);
  • پس بگویی خواجه جاروبی بیار ** تا بجویم زر خود را در غبار
  • Then you will say, ‘Sir, fetch a broom, that I may look in the dust for my gold.’
  • چون بروبی خاک را جمع آوری ** گوییم غلبیر خواهم ای جری
  • When you sweep (with the broom), you will gather dust (along with the gold); you will say to me, ‘I want the sieve, O gallant man.’
  • من ز اول دیدم آخر را تمام ** جای دیگر رو ازینجا والسلام
  • I from the beginning discerned the end complete. Go from here to some other place, and farewell!”
  • بقیه‌ی قصه‌ی آن زاهد کوهی کی نذر کرده بود کی میوه‌ی کوهی از درخت باز نکنم و درخت نفشانم و کسی را نگویم صریح و کنایت کی بیفشان آن خورم کی باد افکنده باشد از درخت
  • The rest of the Story of the ascetic of the mountain who had made a vow that he would not pluck any mountain fruit from the trees or shake the trees or tell any one to shake them, either plainly or in veiled terms, and that he would only eat what the wind might cause to fall from the trees.
  • اندر آن که بود اشجار و ثمار ** بس مرودی کوهی آنجا بی‌شمار
  • On that mountain were trees and fruits; there were many mountain-pears- (they were) numberless.